Hospital Chaplains Contribute to Patient Satisfaction and Well-being
This Week @ ACPE | February 12, 2018

The Joint Commission published a two-part series exploring how chaplains improve the satisfaction and well-being of hospitalized patients and their families. Chaplains are specifically trained to help people during a crisis, which is how patients and family members often view a hospitalization.

Body, Mind, Spirit: Hospital Chaplains Contribute to Patient Satisfaction and Well-Being, Part 1, 
The Source for Joint Commission Compliance Strategies, January 2018, Volume 16, Issue 1
In part 1, Amy Greene, DMin, director of Spiritual Care at the Cleveland Clinic, explained that chaplains have a high tolerance for sadness and anger and know how to help people find internal and external resources to cope with crisis.

Body, Mind, Spirit: Hospital Chaplains Contribute to Patient Satisfaction and Well-Being, Part 2
The Source for Joint Commission Compliance Strategies, February 2018, Volume 16, Issue 2
In part 2, they describe how chaplains help hospitals meet various Joint Commission standards; perform spiritual or religious screenings, histories, and assessments; assist in decisions about end-of-life care; and conduct evidence-based research.

The Joint Commission is an independent, not-for-profit organization, that accredits and certifies nearly 21,000 health care organizations and programs in the United States. Joint Commission accreditation and certification is recognized nationwide as a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to meeting certain performance standards. Visit their website to learn more. 
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